discipleship

How to Disciple Your Worship Ministry

Bruce Benedict on shepherding your team:

I recently had a worship leader ask me how I disciple my worship ministry. It’s a great question and one to which I’ve floundered quite successfully over the years. There are a surprising number of ways that we can gently and consistently disciple our worship ministries over a period of time (here I mean all of the volunteers that serve, not necessarily the congregation which is a different question).

Here is a list of intentional actions I have used over the years.

1. Meet first thing to pray on Sunday mornings before set up or rehearsal
– Read a psalm, pray through the service.
– Some churches have a pastor or elder serve communion to the musicians if that is a difficulty during the service.

2. Help your musicians understand how music serves the whole liturgy/gospel story
Dedicate some time each week whether at rehearsal or on Sunday to explain the gospel flow of your churches liturgy. Help them to understand how music fits into the larger story that is happening. The details and demands of playing and performing can often distract us from the biblical narrative that is unfolding week by week.

3. Have monthly/quarterly music gatherings where you intentionally shepherd
Every three months I have a potluck for all of the musicians where we meet for a time of fellowship, teaching, prep for the next sermon series/ season, and learn new songs.

4. Meet regularly with sound techs
I take my sound techs out to lunch every month or so. Sound techs are your most important volunteers and often the least positively attended to. They work incredibly hard to support all of the staff work that goes into church servies and they should feel loved. Their work on Sunday supports every level at which we want the gospel to be clearly proclaimed (music before and after services, preaching, prayers, scripture, music, etc). Make sure they know the spiritual impact of their technical work.

5. Consistent time with leaders
I plan to spend one-on-one time with my band leaders every three months and general musicians every 6 mo’s. This is time to check in with them and see how they are doing spiritually, with their service in the music ministry, etc. I also hold a yearly retreat in August for the whole worship ministry to talk over the year, teach, fellowship, etc.

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