guitar

Tweak Your Rehearsal in 20 Minutes

Rob Rash is working to find better and more efficient ways to communicate and practice.

I’m always tweaking things. I tweak my phone, my computer, my office, and even my house.

I’ll work at something until it fits, works, or just looks right. As a guitarist, I’m never satisfied with my tone, my action, or my ability. I’m always tweaking things to try and get better, smoother, or faster.

We Can Always Get Better

There are great similarities in the realities of life and the journey that every single soul is on with the journey of faith. We are constantly being pressured, challenged, and changed.

As a worship pastor, I’m always looking at ways to tweak my team, to find better and more efficient ways to communicate and practice. Stepping up my leadership is one major factor, and if you are looking for some books to get started, I’d suggest these.

But even more so than reading a few books and blog posts, I’d like to offer something my team and I have been doing a bit differently that has already made a big difference.

The 20 Minute Tune Up

Most rehearsals go like this: Everyone arrives; a few hello’s; guitars start tuning; drummers start arranging their sets; keyboards start setting up their tones; and vocalists starting warming up their voices.

It can be straight up crazy and hectic. Hardly a time to communicate and get everyone on the same page. So stop fighting the temptations, and noise, and start setting the tone of practice and worship by slowing down.

Take the first 20 or so minutes of your rehearsal and leave the stage. That’s right…leave the stage. Head to your office, green room, or any quiet, private place free of distractions.

Lead your team in a worshipful devotion if you like, and spend a few minutes in prayer. Next, have your worship set queued up in a playlist and ready to go.

Highlighters Ready…

Give your team their music folders or chord sheets and something to write with. (I love highlighters and fine point Sharpies). Start playing your worship songs in the order you will be playing them and encourage conversation. Ask everyone to take notes on their specific parts, i.e. bass lines, drum beats, guitar solos, etc.

Talk through each song about ideas, transitions, and anything relevant to your group. Then, when you’re done, head on into your playing space, and get at it.

This won’t stop all distractions or eliminate every rough patch, but I think you’ll be surprised at how much smoother your rehearsals will go and how unifying this process can be.

Just keep tweaking what works for you and your team. You may only need to listen to the first half of each song, or quite possibly, you may need to listen to the songs again. The idea is there is a time of focus, mental preparation, and spiritual slowness that will really benefit you and your team.

Give it a shot…it will be well worth your time.

Menu

worshipideas:

Essential reading for worship leaders since 2002.

 

Get the latest worship news, ideas and a list

of the top CCLI songs delivered every Tuesday... for FREE!